After four months of closure as a result of the coronavirus health emergency, the National Museum of Colombia has reopened to the public with the biosecurity protocols required by the government. Just weeks after the virtual launch of the museum’s temporary exhibition The Jaguar and the Butterfly. Chiribiquete: a mixed heritage of humanity, Minister of Culture Carmen Vásquez welcomed the first vistors in the company of the Museo Nacional’s director Daniel Castro.

“We are reopening the museum as a message of the importance culture has for societies. Museums are centers of memory and recognition of heritage,” said Vásquez. Visitors will be able to access three rooms including one where the temporary exhibition is housed, as well as the room dedicated to “The history of the museum and the museum in history” and another called “The history of the Panopticon.” The museum served as a penitentiary during colonial times and military garrison in the Thousand Days’ War (1899 -1902).

During the health emergency, the National Museum offered a varied cultural program with a 360-degree virtual tour, online seminars and family-oriented activities. “Although museums were closed, they were permanently in the homes of Colombians through digital platforms and social networks, but we believe that at this time it is important to reopen with all security measures,” added the Minister.

As part of the required biosecurity protocols, the National Museum’s occupancy cannot exceed 20% capacity and all visitors must wear face masks and keep social distancing at two meters. “Our culture is more alive than ever, and we believe that we can visit our cultural spaces taking into account all the biosecurity measures so that people feel that they are places that generate trust,” remarked Vásquez.

The Museum’s admission price is $4,000 pesos (US$1.25) and includes the temporary exhibit on PNN Chiribiquete National Park.

Museo Nacional. Cra 7 No.28-66.